Traveling Luck for Pitcairn

Pitcairn, Oceania

Pitcairn Islander flag

Travel advice for Pitcairn

Pitcairn Islands is located in Oceania, islands in the South Pacific Ocean, about midway between Peru and New Zealand.

Land in Pitcairn Islands is rugged volcanic formation; rocky coastline with cliffs.

Pitcairn Islander land covers an area of 47 square kilometers which is about 0.3 times the size of Washington, DC

As for the Pitcairn Islander climate; tropical; hot and humid; modified by southeast trade winds; rainy season (November to March).

Pitcairn Islander(s) speak English (official), Pitcairnese (mixture of an 18th century English dialect and a Tahitian dialect).

Pitcairn Islander National Map

Pitcairn Islander Map

Regions of Pitcairn

Pitcairn Island was discovered in 1767 by the British and settled in 1790 by the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian companions. Pitcairn was the first Pacific island to become a British colony (in 1838) and today remains the last vestige of that empire in the South Pacific. Outmigration, primarily to New Zealand, has thinned the population from a peak of 233 in 1937 to less than 50 today.

The inhabitants of this tiny isolated economy exist on fishing, subsistence farming, handicrafts, and postage stamps. The fertile soil of the valleys produces a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, including citrus, sugarcane, watermelons, bananas, yams, and beans. Bartering is an important part of the economy. The major sources of revenue are the sale of postage stamps to collectors and the sale of handicrafts to passing ships. In October 2004, more than one-quarter of Pitcairn's small labor force was arrested, putting the economy in a bind, since their services were required as lighter crew to load or unload passing ships.

Pitcairn Islander natural resources include miro trees (used for handicrafts), fish
note: manganese, iron, copper, gold, silver, and zinc have been discovered offshore

Britain's most isolated dependency; only the larger island of Pitcairn is inhabited but it has no port or natural harbor; supplies must be transported by rowed longboat from larger ships stationed offshore

Pitcairn Islander religion is Seventh-Day Adventist 100%.

Natural hazards in Pitcairn Islands include typhoons (especially November to March).

Travel Advice on Pitcairn

Pitcairn Island

This advice has been reviewed and reissued.  The overall level of the advice has not changed.

SUMMARY

  • Pitcairn Island is a British Overseas Territory.  There is no formal British diplomatic or consular representation.

  • All visitors to Pitcairn must obtain a "licence to land and reside" from the Pitcairn Islands Office in Auckland before travelling.

  • Transfer to and from the island is by boat and can be dangerous in adverse weather conditions.  There is no regular shipping schedule and no air access to the island.

  • We strongly recommend that you obtain comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.  Medical facilities are limited.  You should ensure that your travel insurance covers medical evacuation.  You should check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for the activities you want to undertake.  Please see: Travel Insurance.

  • The threat from terrorism is low.


SAFETY AND SECURITY

Terrorism
The threat from terrorism is low. But you should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks which could be against civilian targets, including places frequented by foreigners.  Please read:  “Security and General Tips and Risk of Terrorism when Travelling Overseas for further information and advice.
Crime
Any type of crime against visitors is rare.
Political Situation
Pitcairn Island Country Profile
Road Safety
Pitcairn has one sealed road.  There are no other proper roads on Pitcairn, only dirt tracks.  Transport around the island is by quad bike or on foot.  All quad bikes are privately owned and therefore most visitors travel on foot.  Longer-term visitors who propose using a quad bike are required to pass a driving test before a licence will be issued.
Sea Safety
Transfer to and from the island is by boat only and can be dangerous in adverse weather conditions.


LOCAL LAWS AND CUSTOMS

You should note that it is illegal to import alcohol without a licence.  It is also illegal to drink alcohol in a public place.  The main religion on Pitcairn is Seventh Day Adventism.  Sabbath is observed on Saturday.
The import of plant and animal products is strictly controlled and visitors should contact the Pitcairn Islands Office in Auckland for advice before travelling.


ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

All visitors to Pitcairn must obtain a "licence to land and reside" from the Pitcairn Islands Office in Auckland before travelling.  Details can be found on the following website:  http://www.government.pn/tourist.htm.

Single parents or other adults travelling alone with children should be aware that some countries require documentary evidence of parental responsibility before allowing lone parents to enter the country or, in some cases, before permitting the children to leave the country.


HEALTH

Pitcairn has a medical clinic and a resident doctor, but you should note that medical facilities are limited.  The nearest hospital facilities are in French Polynesia or New Zealand, at least four days sail away.  We strongly recommend that you obtain comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.  You should ensure that your travel insurance covers medical evacuation.  You should check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for the activities you want to undertake.  Please see:  Travel Insurance
For further information on health, check the Department of Health’s website at:  www.dh.gov.uk


GENERAL

Pitcairn has a medical clinic and a resident doctor, but you should note that medical facilities are limited.  The nearest hospital facilities are in French Polynesia or New Zealand, at least 4 days sail away.  We strongly recommend that you obtain comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.  You should ensure that your travel insurance covers medical evacuation.  You should check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for the activities you want to undertake.  Please see:  Travel Insurance
For further information on health, check the Department of Health’s website at:  www.dh.gov.uk